Victoriapark Dental

Definition: Pulpectomy

Often called a “partial root canal,” a pulpectomy is a procedure performed to remove all of the pulp from the pulp chamber of a tooth, including the roots and crown.

Is Pulpectomy for me?

If the pulp in a tooth is infected and it can't be cleared up, a pulpectomy may be required. The procedure is done in order to ensure infected pulp doesn't continue to spread, which can result in the loss of teeth.

Pulp is the soft tissue inside teeth. It has cells that make dentin, the hard material teeth are made of. If pulp is infected it is considered to be a serious issue as it can be very painful and can spread to the jaw and adjacent teeth. Infections in teeth are often visible to the dentist as abscesses can develop on the tooth or along the gumline and are confirmed by taking x-rays.

Sometimes this treatment is necessary on a child's primary teeth if infection is identified. If necessary, a pulpectomy can prevent the premature loss of primary teeth, which can lead to bite and alignment issues later on.

The Process

  1. First, the Dentist creates a small access whole on the tooths surface.
  2. Next, the Dentist removes the diseased nervous tissue, the infected pulp, and other decayed debris from the tooth's canal(s).
  3. Third, the tooth's canal(s) are sanitized with an antibacterial solution and then set up to receive the restorative material.
  4. Lastly, the pulp chamber of the tooth, the tooth's canal(s), and the surface access hole are filled and covered with a restorative material.
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